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Buying better: How to be a conscious consumer

As we enter a new year, on the heels of a global health crisis, still very much in the midst of a pandemic, the questions we ask ourselves this January have changed, haven’t they? Here at The Goodness Company, we are ready to recommit to our core values of being a conscious brand. And in that spirit, we wanted to elaborate what being a conscious consumer actually means.

"Every time you spend money, you're casting a vote for the kind of world you want."

- Anne Lappe

First off, a conscious consumer looks at more than just the price of a product. They prefer supporting brands that are ethical in their practices, and fair in how they conduct their business. Are employees paid and treated well? Do they support causes and/or organisations?

First off, a conscious consumer looks at more than just the price of a product. They prefer supporting brands that are ethical in their practices, and fair in how they conduct their business. Are employees paid and treated well? Do they support causes and/or organisations?

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Secondly, you want to know whether a brand is ecologically sensitive or not. Do they cause a lot of pollution? Are they looking at reducing that actively, or are they green-washing? If the product or service allows for it, are they organic in how they manufacture/market?

Secondly, you want to know whether a brand is ecologically sensitive or not. Do they cause a lot of pollution? Are they looking at reducing that actively, or are they green-washing? If the product or service allows for it, are they organic in how they manufacture/market?

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Thirdly, you want to bring a lot of thoughtfulness and consideration into your own consumption patterns. Align your buying habits to their environmental and social impacts. And make sure you support local business and small business, in order to reduce your own carbon footprint.

Thirdly, you want to bring a lot of thoughtfulness and consideration into your own consumption patterns. Align your buying habits to their environmental and social impacts. And make sure you support local business and small business, in order to reduce your own carbon footprint.

"If individuals begin to primarily support corporations that use sustainable processes, then hopefully, the rest of the market will shift toward prioritising these values."

- Anne Else